How to Use Cricut Foil Iron On – And a Few Things NOT to do!

How to Use Cricut Foil Iron On

How to Use Cricut Foil Iron On – And a Few Things NOT to do!

One of my latest favorite materials to work with from Cricut is their foil!

Whether it’s from their Iron On line or the adhesive stainless foil…I love it all.

It’s just so shiny and versatile – and I feel like it’s perfect for holidays…such as the Fourth of July (make sure you check out these two fun Fourth of July cut files I created!).

So for my post this month that I’m doing in partnership with my friends over at Cricut, I decided I would share a tutorial about how to use Cricut Foil Iron On.

But before I share that, I wanted to keep things real and let you know that I have had some major issues with this at first. In my Cricut Support group, I often hear fellow Cricut-ers lament on how they just can’t seem to get their projects right.

So I think it’s important to share some of my goof-ups…so people know that even the “experts” (not that I really consider myself one 😉 mess up to.

I’m hoping that by sharing these few things NOT to do will save you some time and some headaches! These tips can probably be applied to most iron-on materials (like this iron-on holographic sparkle!).

Make sure it’s Iron-on

Okay, this is probably one of those moments where you are like, “Duh!” But mistakes can happen.

I was so excited to get started on my projects, that when I went to Jo-ann’s to pick up my foil…I accidentally grabbed the stainless foil…NOT the iron-on!

And it wasn’t until I went to put the foil on my project that I realized it wasn’t iron-on.

I think I’ll chalk this one up to mom brain.

Sign.

So, just always double…no, triple, check that you are using the foil that you are intending to use!

Mirror Your Image!

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been working on an iron-on project, only to remember part way through my cut that I didn’t mirror the image.

Seriously one of the worst feelings when you are working with your Cricut machine!

Fortunately, when you select iron-on materials through Cricut Design Space…it will usually remind you to mirror it. However, when working with iron-on file, I only see a Foil – Adhesive Backed, setting, which doesn’t automatically assume you are mirroring.

So make sure you mirror ALL your images – especially if there are multiple cuts in your design.

Cut Liner Side Down

Whenever I hear liner, I always assume it’s just the opposite side of the color.

Tis not true with iron-on materials. I mess up with this occasionally when I’m not really thinking about it.

With the iron-on foil, the liner is actually clear, so it’s covering the colored side. You can’t tell it’s the liner until you go to peel it off…but I assure you, that’s the side that needs to be facing down!

So, just remember this – cut with the color side down!

Test your Material

For iron-on foil, Cricut typically recommends the “wool” setting on your iron. While this typically works well, with my recent pillow project, I found that the foil was not sticking to it. I turned up the iron a little bit, and it worked much better!

Work in Small Areas

I really had issues when I was working on my Fourth of July pillows. I wasn’t thinking, and I put down my entire design on the pillow and went to work.

Unfortunately, some parts of the foil adhered to the pillows…while other parts did not. And it just ended up being a big mess.

When working with iron on materials, I think it is wise to cut the design into smaller pieces and work in those small areas.

Of course, if you have a heat press, it’s a little easier to do it all at once – a heat press is definitely on my wish list right now!

How to Use Cricut Foil Iron On

Okay, now it’s time for the tutorial on how to use this fun material. It’s really quite easy!

First off…make your design! You can do just about anything. Foil Iron on is ideal for home decor, shirts, canvas bags, etc.

Once you’ve created your design, press the continue button in Design Space.

Make sure your design is situated on the mat the way you want it, and then select “mirror image” before you press continue.

Once you’ve pressed continue, change the dial on your Cricut Explore Air to “Custom”. In Design Space, you will select Foil, Adhesive Backed – .25mm (Cricut).

Next, you will load your materials. Make sure you place the material liner/color side down and load it into the machine. Press your flashing Cricut button on your machine and watch the magic happen!

Once your cut is finished, weed out the excess material. Now it’s time to iron it on!

Heat your iron to the “wool” setting.

Preheat the area you will be ironing on to. About 15 seconds will do.

Place the iron-on foil with the plastic sheet facing up onto your material. Iron for about 30 seconds.

Slowly peel up (I usually go left to right) to make sure it’s on there nice and secure. If it is, remove the plastic liner completely and enjoy!

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

One of my latest favorite materials to work with from Cricut is their foil!

Whether it’s from their Iron On line or the adhesive stainless foil…I love it all.

It’s just so shiny and versatile – and I feel like it’s perfect for holidays…such as the Fourth of July (make sure you check out these two fun Fourth of July cut files I created!).

So for my post this month that I’m doing in partnership with my friends over at Cricut, I decided I would share a tutorial about how to use Cricut Foil Iron On.

But before I share that, I wanted to keep things real and let you know that I have had some major issues with this at first. In my Cricut Support group, I often hear fellow Cricut-ers lament on how they just can’t seem to get their projects right.

So I think it’s important to share some of my goof-ups…so people know that even the “experts” (not that I really consider myself one 😉 mess up to.

I’m hoping that by sharing these few things NOT to do will save you some time and some headaches! These tips can probably be applied to most iron-on materials (like this iron-on holographic sparkle!).

Make sure it’s Iron-on

Okay, this is probably one of those moments where you are like, “Duh!” But mistakes can happen.

I was so excited to get started on my projects, that when I went to Jo-ann’s to pick up my foil…I accidentally grabbed the stainless foil…NOT the iron-on!

And it wasn’t until I went to put the foil on my project that I realized it wasn’t iron-on.

I think I’ll chalk this one up to mom brain.

Sign.

So, just always double…no, triple, check that you are using the foil that you are intending to use!

Mirror Your Image!

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been working on an iron-on project, only to remember part way through my cut that I didn’t mirror the image.

Seriously one of the worst feelings when you are working with your Cricut machine!

Fortunately, when you select iron-on materials through Cricut Design Space…it will usually remind you to mirror it. However, when working with iron-on file, I only see a Foil – Adhesive Backed, setting, which doesn’t automatically assume you are mirroring.

So make sure you mirror ALL your images – especially if there are multiple cuts in your design.

Cut Liner Side Down

Whenever I hear liner, I always assume it’s just the opposite side of the color.

Tis not true with iron-on materials. I mess up with this occasionally when I’m not really thinking about it.

With the iron-on foil, the liner is actually clear, so it’s covering the colored side. You can’t tell it’s the liner until you go to peel it off…but I assure you, that’s the side that needs to be facing down!

So, just remember this – cut with the color side down!

Test your Material

For iron-on foil, Cricut typically recommends the “wool” setting on your iron. While this typically works well, with my recent pillow project, I found that the foil was not sticking to it. I turned up the iron a little bit, and it worked much better!

Work in Small Areas

I really had issues when I was working on my Fourth of July pillows. I wasn’t thinking, and I put down my entire design on the pillow and went to work.

Unfortunately, some parts of the foil adhered to the pillows…while other parts did not. And it just ended up being a big mess.

When working with iron on materials, I think it is wise to cut the design into smaller pieces and work in those small areas.

Of course, if you have a heat press, it’s a little easier to do it all at once – a heat press is definitely on my wish list right now!

How to Use Cricut Foil Iron On

Okay, now it’s time for the tutorial on how to use this fun material. It’s really quite easy!

First off…make your design! You can do just about anything. Foil Iron on is ideal for home decor, shirts, canvas bags, etc.

Once you’ve created your design, press the continue button in Design Space.

Make sure your design is situated on the mat the way you want it, and then select “mirror image” before you press continue.

Once you’ve pressed continue, change the dial on your Cricut Explore Air to “Custom”. In Design Space, you will select Foil, Adhesive Backed – .25mm (Cricut).

Next, you will load your materials. Make sure you place the material liner/color side down and load it into the machine. Press your flashing Cricut button on your machine and watch the magic happen!

Once your cut is finished, weed out the excess material. Now it’s time to iron it on!

Heat your iron to the “wool” setting.

Preheat the area you will be ironing on to. About 15 seconds will do.

Place the iron-on foil with the plastic sheet facing up onto your material. Iron for about 30 seconds.

Slowly peel up (I usually go left to right) to make sure it’s on there nice and secure. If it is, remove the plastic liner completely and enjoy!

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2 Comments

  • Hello, thank you so much for the interesting video and post. I dream of buying a cricut so I browse the net for information. I just wondered why you made the transfer on the wrong side of the material... maybe just for the sake of demonstration?? Thanks.

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